The A.G.L Shaw Lecture

Alan George Lewers Shaw AO, FAHA, FASSA, FRAHS, FRHSV (1916 – 2012) was an RHSV Councillor from 1965 to 1971 and President from 1987 to 1991. He is also a Benefactor of the Royal Historical Society of Victoria. He was President of the C J La Trobe Society as well and the two organisations, the C J La Trobe Society and the RHSV, have jointly presented the annual A G L Shaw lecture since 2002 as a tribute to a great historian.

2018

Michael O’Brien, Charles La Trobe and Hugh Childers: The Ladder of Success in Victoria.

2017

Keir Reeves, The Historical Legacy of Victoria’s Goldrushes.

2016

Marguerita Stephens, Unless a Portion be given to the Idle: The Kulin and the New Poor Law at Port Phillip.

2015

Madonna Grehan, Charles Joseph La Trobe and the Regulation of Everyday Life: implementing the Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act in Victoria, 1852 1858.

2014

Andrew Lemon and Marjorie Morgan, Superintendent La Trobe and the Cataraqui, Australia’s worst shipwreck.

2013

Margaret Bowman, Portrait of the Artist as a young Settler: George Alexander Gilbert.

2012

Susan Priestley, Crises of 1852 for Lieutenant-Governor La Trobe, Captain William Dugdale and Henrietta Augusta Davies.

2011

David Dunstan, Charles and Sophie La Trobe and the Vignerons: the Birth of an Industry in nineteenth century Victoria.

2010

Bev Roberts, A Black Apron View of History? Anne Drysdale & Caroline Newcomb, Victoria’s ‘Lady Squatters’.

2009

Paul Mullaly, Crime in the Port Phillip District 1835-51.

2008

Val Noone, From Charles La Trobe to Charles Gavan Duffy: Selectors, Squatters and Aborigines.

2007

Robert Kenny, The Moravian Charles Joseph La Trobe.

2006

Dianne Reilly, Charles La Trobe: the Forgotten Governor.

2005

Anne Neale, Who was Edward La Trobe Bateman?

2004

Paul Fox, The First Primrose from England: sentiment and reality in Gardening, early Port Phillip.

2003

Ray Wright, Learning to Legislate: Victoria’s first Legislative Council, 1851-56.

2002

David Dunstan, Twists and Turns: the Newspaper Press as a force in Port Phillip and early Victorian history.