Rural Life Museum

89 Bromley Rd Robinvale VIC 3549 Australia
89 Bromley Road Robinvale Victoria 3549 AU
Contact Name
Rural Life Museum
Rating
Featured/Unfeatured
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Euston-Robinvale Historical Society Inc 0 km
Contact Name
Euston-Robinvale Historical Society Inc
Big Lizzie Red Cliffs Icon, Red Cliffs & District Historical Society.jpg
Old Court House, 24-28 Jamieson Avenue, Red Cliffs 3496 61.5 km

The Society has a collection of memorabilia, photographs and written records relevant to the history and development of the district. The largest project has been to create a wall of honour, photos of the original settlers and their wives, along with many of those who set up the township.

[caption id="attachment_2489" align="alignnone" width="792"]Front view of the former court house on a sunny day Former Red Cliffs Courthouse and home to Red Cliffs & District Historical Society[/caption]

Profile Image: Big Lizzie, an icon of Red Cliffs. Read more about the history of Big Lizzie.

 

Contact Name
Lucy Hamilton, Secretary
Oke Street, Ouyen 3490 68.1 km

Research, collect, document and publish local history to make this information available to the public. Established 1984 as Local History Resource Centre. Amalgamated with Mallee Genealogical Society 2008.

Contact Name
Merle Pole, President
P.O. Box 2057 Mildura VIC 3502 Australia 72.52 km
Contact Name
Mildura & District Historical Society Inc.
Mildura VIC 3500 Australia 72.64 km
Contact Name
Chaffey Trail
121 Commercial St Merbein VIC 3505 Australia 79.74 km
Bernadette Wells 0409 437 726
Contact Name
Merbein Historical Society
37 Adelaide St Wentworth NSW 2648 Australia 94.65 km
Contact Name
Wentworth Historical Society
Tyntynder outside small.jpg
Murray Valley Highway, Beverford VIC 3590 Australia 95.25 km

Tyntyndyer (Tyntynder in modern spelling) homestead  is in the Swan Hill irrigation district, 16 km north of Swan Hill in north-west Victoria. The heritage-listed homestead was built in 1846 by Andrew & Peter Beveridge who took up the Tyntyndyer pastoral run. The pastoral run was the first European settlement in the Swan Hill district.

The Tyntyndyer Plains, stretching along the Victorian banks of the mighty Milloo (Murray River) was home to the Watti Watti people for thousands of years. Their homes were built of bark and mud, mia-mias and they farmed the land. Native grass seeds and nardoo were harvested and ground for flour, stubble was burnt and lush regrowth attracted grazing stock – kangaroos and emu. Fish nets were woven from the fibrous roots of reeds and quandong, the native fruit, was harvested and dried. reeds, for spears, and possum skins were traded for green stone, used for axes. Major Mitchell arrived at ‘Matakupa’ in 1836 and named the area Swan Hill. In 1846 the Beveridge brothers travelled from Kilmore by bullock dray and settled on 300 square miles of land. The property retained the name of these rich grass plains and became known as Tyntyndyer Station.

The construction of the homestead, of drop log cabin cabin of Murray Pine, was commenced in that year. Bricked over in 1850, with had made bricks, this has been classified as the first brick veneer in Australia. The homestead was completed in 1854 with a solid brick extension and in 1860 roof iron, brought from Glasgow, was placed over the stringy bark shingles.

The homestead, furnishings, collections and artifacts have all remained intact and now offer an excellent, authentic and fascinating insight into early colonial days.

  • Wonderful inventions that remained at Tyntyndyer from the early settlers
  • Cellar – filled with an amazing collection of Aboriginal artifacts and curios from indigenous cultures around the world – protected under the custodianship of the Watti Watti people
  • Chock log cabin kitchen – floor to ceiling full of bric-a-brac and pioneer memorabilia (1854)
  • Enter the schoolhouse and tutor room (1854) and see the assorted collections of sewing samplers, school work and early photographic equipment
  • “Tyntyndyer” is the Aboriginal name of the area and means “song of the birds” and true to it’s name the quiet gardens and huge trees which shade the homestead today play host to a variety of beautiful native birds (garden established in the mid 1800s with assistance from Baron Von Mueller)
Contact Name
Nettie Adams, Secretary
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