A Story of Stations: The architecture of Victoria’s railways in the nineteenth century by Andrew Ward

A Story of Stations by Andrew C. Ward

 published by Australian Railway Historical Society Victorian Division, Newport Vic 3015
November 2019

In this new hard-cover book of 358 pages is told the story of the station buildings of the Victorian Railways. It begins in the 1850s when the colony’s first railways were opened by privately owned companies and follows the colourful story of station building by the Department up to the turn of the twentieth century.

There was a time when nothing moved unless it went by rail , a time when colonial governments saw it as a part of their charter to provide a comprehensive transport system, creating permanent employment and training for thousands of their servants and moving passengers and goods of all descriptions, regularly, across the country.

They established railway administrations employing highly skilled officers to build and manage elaborate infrastructures made up of the permanent way, carriages, wagons, locomotives and the station complexes through which travellers would pass on their way to distant places.

The author, Andrew Ward, is a retired architect and is the author of studies leading to the inclusion of many station buildings on the Victorian Heritage Register and has an intimate knowledge of railway architecture in this state.

$79.95

4 in stock

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Description

A Story of Stations by Andrew C. Ward

 published by Australian Railway Historical Society Victorian Division, Newport Vic 3015
November 2019

In this new hard-cover book of 358 pages is told the story of the station buildings of the Victorian Railways. It begins in the 1850s when the colony’s first railways were opened by privately owned companies and follows the colourful story of station building by the Department up to the turn of the twentieth century.

There was a time when nothing moved unless it went by rail , a time when colonial governments saw it as a part of their charter to provide a comprehensive transport system, creating permanent employment and training for thousands of their servants and moving passengers and goods of all descriptions, regularly, across the country.

They established railway administrations employing highly skilled officers to build and manage elaborate infrastructures made up of the permanent way, carriages, wagons, locomotives and the station complexes through which travellers would pass on their way to distant places.

The author, Andrew Ward, is a retired architect and is the author of studies leading to the inclusion of many station buildings on the Victorian Heritage Register and has an intimate knowledge of railway architecture in this state.

Additional information

Weight 1.3 kg
Dimensions 22 × 25 × 3 cm

Book Reviews Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “A Story of Stations: The architecture of Victoria’s railways in the nineteenth century by Andrew Ward”

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