Land They Learnt to Love. By Glenice Wood Lake

The story of the earliest squatters and settlements in Buninyong and what was to become Ballarat is told in the book…

The Land They Learnt to Love: ten years in the life of a squatting family in the Port Phillip District, 1839 – 1849.

This book traces Andrew Scott and his family’s departure from Scotland and their arrival in Sydney on 31st December, 1838 and Melbourne three weeks later.  It outlines his early exploration of land in the districts of the Moorabool country around Geelong, the Leigh River, the Goulburn and Campaspe Rivers, the Werribee River and then in the areas surrounding Mt. Buninyong in 1839. The Mt. Boninyong run was taken up in October, 1839, and it bordered the Balla Arat station taken up a year earlier.

The early homestead at Mt. Boninyong, c. 1870s. The artist is thought to be Sarah Scott, grand-daughter of Andrew Scott.

Six years later, further exploration of country along the Wimmera River was made before the Scotts took up the ‘Werraknabeal’ stations that were established on the east and west banks of the Yarriambiack Creek.

The book is an accurate depiction of the life of the early squatters in the colony as the Scotts recorded events and trials and tribulations in their diaries during the family’s first ten years of life in the district, including their relationships with neighbouring squatters and their Aboriginal workers in the Wimmera. The Scotts became highly successful pastoralists in the colony, laying the foundations for generations to come.    Most of the family returned to Scotland for holidays, but they all returned to Australia to the land they had learnt to love.

xvii, 214 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.

ISBN: 9780648296201

Published: [Ballarat, Victoria] : [Glenice Wood Lake], 2018.

 

$35.00

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Description

The story of the earliest squatters and settlements in Buninyong and what was to become Ballarat is told in the book…

The Land They Learnt to Love: ten years in the life of a squatting family in the Port Phillip District, 1839 – 1849.

This book traces Andrew Scott and his family’s departure from Scotland and their arrival in Sydney on 31st December, 1838 and Melbourne three weeks later.  It outlines his early exploration of land in the districts of the Moorabool country around Geelong, the Leigh River, the Goulburn and Campaspe Rivers, the Werribee River and then in the areas surrounding Mt. Buninyong in 1839. The Mt. Boninyong run was taken up in October, 1839, and it bordered the Balla Arat station taken up a year earlier.

The early homestead at Mt. Boninyong, c. 1870s. The artist is thought to be Sarah Scott, grand-daughter of Andrew Scott.

Six years later, further exploration of country along the Wimmera River was made before the Scotts took up the ‘Werraknabeal’ stations that were established on the east and west banks of the Yarriambiack Creek.

The book is an accurate depiction of the life of the early squatters in the colony as the Scotts recorded events and trials and tribulations in their diaries during the family’s first ten years of life in the district, including their relationships with neighbouring squatters and their Aboriginal workers in the Wimmera. The Scotts became highly successful pastoralists in the colony, laying the foundations for generations to come.    Most of the family returned to Scotland for holidays, but they all returned to Australia to the land they had learnt to love.

xvii, 214 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.

ISBN: 9780648296201

Published: [Ballarat, Victoria] : [Glenice Wood Lake], 2018.

 

Additional information

Weight 0.515 kg
Dimensions 23.5 × 15 × 1.5 cm

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