Top Dog of the West: a study of the Belfast and Western District Civil Service 1841-1885. By Pamela Marriott

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(1 customer review)

This study of the Belfast and Western District Civil Service from 1841 to 1855 includes detailed first source information, index, illustrations and listings of all known public servants in the district during the timeframe in five appendices. The work was researched over a 30-year period.

ISBN:  9780646978772

$50.00

1 in stock

Book Reviews

  1. Rated 4 out of 5

    Pamela Marriott

    Today little remains of the once proud edifice, known as the Royal Merri Jig Hotel, in Port Fairy. Like a centurion to the past is the cottage on the corner of Campbell and Gipps streets, built originally as the Belfast Inn, by John Finn. Approximately 45 metres in length, and running along Campbell street, the Royal Merri Jig kept up a lively flow of patrons. There were sleeping arrangements, a stable and a ballroom, long held dear by the squatting fraternity of the Western District. Patronage fell away and controversy ensued, when ardent Scot publican Burns hoisted the cross of St Andrew on his building. Too, the gold rush came and Burns found his way to Sawpit Gully, to again ply his trade. This left the Merrijig empty. The newly-elected government of the Colony of Victoria was searching for a suitable building to house its various departments in the Western District. The only place available at the time was the former hotel. In 1853 the head station for the police was established at Belfast, along with the various courts, immigration, customs, the receipt and pay office and public works. Later the Belfast Road District office was added to the mix. The head station for the police was removed to Hamilton in 1878. A heady period lay in the interim before specialised buildings for customs and the court house were built, at Belfast, and places far away received their own administrators of law and order. In this book Pam searches through a daunting number of records at the Public Records Office, libraries, newspapers and others to present a fascinating record of the lives, people and history of not only the departments housed at the former hotel, but for more than 30 different communities throughout the Western District. A reflection of life itself there are outrageous incidents, heart-breaking atrocities, happiness, fools and more, but above all the hard-working public servants, who volunteered or who were sent by the government to service an areas consisting of at least one quarter of the colony. Using biographical detailing techniques, along with facts. fine detailing and an ability to get everything into chronological order, despite the huge number of communities involved, no wonder this book was commended by the Royal Historical Society of Victoria in its 2018 awards. Pam recognises that there is a lot more to be known and has established a Facebook page at pamelamarriott@inthepipeline, where she would enjoy your observances or comments, as she now looks at the government site of Trove. Finding out more has always been a passion of Pam’s.

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Description

This study of the Belfast and Western District Civil Service from 1841 to 1855 includes detailed first source information, index, illustrations and listings of all known public servants in the district during the timeframe in five appendices. The work was researched over a 30-year period.

ISBN:  9780646978772

Additional information

Weight 1.175 kg
Dimensions 25 × 17.5 × 3 cm

Book Reviews

  1. Rated 4 out of 5

    Pamela Marriott

    Today little remains of the once proud edifice, known as the Royal Merri Jig Hotel, in Port Fairy. Like a centurion to the past is the cottage on the corner of Campbell and Gipps streets, built originally as the Belfast Inn, by John Finn. Approximately 45 metres in length, and running along Campbell street, the Royal Merri Jig kept up a lively flow of patrons. There were sleeping arrangements, a stable and a ballroom, long held dear by the squatting fraternity of the Western District. Patronage fell away and controversy ensued, when ardent Scot publican Burns hoisted the cross of St Andrew on his building. Too, the gold rush came and Burns found his way to Sawpit Gully, to again ply his trade. This left the Merrijig empty. The newly-elected government of the Colony of Victoria was searching for a suitable building to house its various departments in the Western District. The only place available at the time was the former hotel. In 1853 the head station for the police was established at Belfast, along with the various courts, immigration, customs, the receipt and pay office and public works. Later the Belfast Road District office was added to the mix. The head station for the police was removed to Hamilton in 1878. A heady period lay in the interim before specialised buildings for customs and the court house were built, at Belfast, and places far away received their own administrators of law and order. In this book Pam searches through a daunting number of records at the Public Records Office, libraries, newspapers and others to present a fascinating record of the lives, people and history of not only the departments housed at the former hotel, but for more than 30 different communities throughout the Western District. A reflection of life itself there are outrageous incidents, heart-breaking atrocities, happiness, fools and more, but above all the hard-working public servants, who volunteered or who were sent by the government to service an areas consisting of at least one quarter of the colony. Using biographical detailing techniques, along with facts. fine detailing and an ability to get everything into chronological order, despite the huge number of communities involved, no wonder this book was commended by the Royal Historical Society of Victoria in its 2018 awards. Pam recognises that there is a lot more to be known and has established a Facebook page at pamelamarriott@inthepipeline, where she would enjoy your observances or comments, as she now looks at the government site of Trove. Finding out more has always been a passion of Pam’s.

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